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Committees

International Organizing Committee (IOC)

Name
Bio

Bernie Bienstock began his aerospace career at Hughes, and continued working under Boeing leadership at the turn of the century. In pursuit of his passion for science and space exploration, he began a new career at JPL, where he currently enjoys working with scientists and engineers in formulating new missions at Earth, the Solar System, and the cosmos.

Chair

Ozgur Karatekin started his career at von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics (VKI) on aero-thermodynamics and dynamic stability of planetary entry probes. He is currently working at Royal Observatory of Belgium as Senior Research Scientist on present and future planetary missions.

EU Co-chair

Dr. James O. Arnold received his B.S. in Engineering Physics from the University of Kansas in 1962, his M.S. from Stanford in Aeronautics and Astronautics in 1967 and his Ph.D in Molecular Physics from York University Toronto in 1972. He has been affiliated with NASA for five decades and retired from the position of Chief of the Space Technology Division in 2002. He has worked for the University of California, Santa Cruz for the last 10 years. His technical experience is broad, including aerothermodynamics, Thermal Protection Systems (TPS), theoretical spectroscopy and computational chemistry. His experimental research involved shock tubes, ballistic ranges and arcjects. He served at the branch and division level management levels for NASA for 20 years. His career began with work on the Apollo Program. He is a Fellow of the AIAA

Dr. David H. Atkinson, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Idaho and the Associate Director of the Idaho NASA Space Grant and Idaho NASA EPSCoR (Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research) programs, has been a Principle or Co-Investigator on more than twenty NASA proposals, both research and educational. He was a Co-Investigator on the NASA/ESA (European Space Agency) Cassini/Huygens Doppler Wind Experiment that successfully measured the winds in the atmosphere of Titan (the largest moon of Saturn) in 2006, and was the Chair of the European Space Agency Huygens Probe Descent Trajectory Working Group. As the Lead of the Galileo Doppler Wind Experiment, Dr. Atkinson performed the first measurements of the very deep atmospheric winds on Jupiter in 1995.

Dr. Atkinson has undergraduate degrees from Whitman College (Astronomy/Physics) in 1977 and from Washington State University (Electrical Engineering) in 1980, a Master's degree in Applied Physics from Stanford University in 1981, and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Washington State University in 1989. From 1981 through 1986 Dr. Atkinson worked as a Systems Engineer at NASA Ames Research Center on the Galileo mission to Jupiter and the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF).

Dr. Atkinson is one of the co-founders of the International Planetary Probe Workshops along with Dr. Jean-Pierre Lebreton from ESA.

Pat holds a Ph. D. in Chemistry from Caltech and has been at JPL-Caltech for over 20 years in a variety of technical and project leadership positions. Currently she manages the Technology Task in support of the Planetary Science Division at NASA HQ, is a Co-I and lead for the surface chemistry theme on the NAI Titan as a Prebiotic Chemical System award and also manages the development of cryogenic instrumentation to measure the composition and structure of organics on Titan’s surface and in the atmosphere.

Jean-Marc Bouilly graduated from Ecole Centrale Paris in 1984. After joining EADS Astrium (Aerospatiale at that time) in 1985, he has been in charge of TPS development for military applications, and then for the Atmospheric Reentry Demonstrator ARD and Huygens. Later, he managed the Thermal and Thermomechanical Engineering section for 11 years. Since 2008, he has served as the Deputy Head of EADS Astrium’s Reentry Systems and Technologies Department and was appointed as an expert in thermal analysis and TPS. He is supporting advanced projects and preliminary projects phases for atmospheric entry vehicles (AeroFast, Rastas Spear, ARV, ExoMars, Radflight, Marco Polo, MSRO, EVE…) and is leading Astrium’s R&T activities on Reentry Technologies.

Athena Coustenis is Director of Research with the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) of France, working at Paris Observatory in Meudon. Her specialty is Planetology and Space Techniques. Her research is devoted to the investigation of planetary atmospheres and surfaces, with emphasis on icy moons like Titan and Enceladus, Saturn’s satellites, and Jupiter’s Ganymede and Europa, objects with high astrobiological potential. She also works on the characterisation of exoplanetary atmospheres.

She is Co-Investigator of three of the instruments (CIRS, HASI, DISR) aboard the Cassini/Huygens mission. In 2007 and 2008 she was the Lead European Scientist of the Titan/Saturn System Mission (TSSM) studied jointly by ESA and NASA. Since 2009, she was involved, as European Science co-Lead, in the JUICE mission to study Ganymede and the Jupiter’s system, currently planned for launch by ESA in 2022.

Her expertise in space missions has allowed her to Chair and to contribute in several advisory groups within ESA and NASA. She is currently President of the EGU Planetary Sciences Division and President of the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences, as well as Secretary of the Executive committee of the Division for Planetary Sciences.

James A. Cutts is Manager of the Strategic Missions and Advanced Concepts Office at JPL. Prior to this position he was Chief Technologist for the Solar System Exploration Directorate. His scientific and technical interests include the use of aerial platforms in planetary exploration and strategic planning for planetary exploration. He led the JPL support for the 2006 Solar System Exploration Roadmap30 year plan for exploration of our solar system. He has been involved in the International Planetary Probe Workshop since the second workshop. He hosted IPPW-4 at JPL in 2006 and has served on the International Organizing Committee since that time. He is currently the associate editor for the International Journal of Planetary Probes (IJOPP)

PI of AMELIA: EDL science experiment of the ESA ExoMars project.

She has been deputy PI for the HASI instrument on the ESA Huygens probe of the NASA/ASI/ESA Cassini mission; Co-proposer /CoI of several in situ instruments (e.g. for Mars NetLander, ExoMars PASTEUR, Titan and Venus). She has been acting as Project Scientist of the NetLander project within the French Mars Sample Return programme at CNES (2000-2002).She has been studying planetary atmospheres and Martian dust devils by means of in situ measurements.

Rodrigo Haya is Aeronautical Engineer for the Polytechnics University of Madrid (UPM) and pilot. He is the head of the Atmospheric Flight Division in the Aerospace Engineering Business Unit of DEIMOS Space. Mr. Haya is responsible of the atmospheric Flight activities, covering Flight Mechanics, Mission analysis and Guidance, mostly related to planetary entry. He has more than 16 years experience in the aerospace sector, including work as Flight Test engineer for fighters and transport aircraft. He has been involved is most of atmospheric entry activities in ESA since 2003, covering covering robotic and manned missions, operational and experimental vehicles, ground and airborne launch, launchers and re-entry vehicles, Earth and exploration, institutional and commercial ventures. He has been involved in IPPW since 2007 (IPPW-5), being session chairman in IPPW-7, PoC EU chair in IPPW-8 and session convener in IPPW-10.

David Mimoun is an Associate Professor at Institut Superieur de l'Aeronautique et de l'Espace, for the SUPAERO Engineering Degree.

He was the LOC chair for IPPW9. He is currently SEIS instrument project scientist for the InSight mission.


Aaron Morris has worked primarily in the fields of aerospace engineering and systems engineering. He has performed aerodynamics analyses and flight-testing on a variety of aircraft, missiles, and spacecraft, including, the 767 Tanker, Supersonic Sea Skimming Target, Super-MQM Target Drone, the Space Shuttle, and Orion. He currently works as the Systems Engineering Technical Authority for Entry, Descent, and Landing within the NASA Game Changing Program. Prior to coming to the Game Changing Program he managed a group of engineers responsible for the analysis and flight-testing of Orion’s parachutes. Mr. Morris has undergraduate and graduate degrees in Aerospace Engineering, Business Administration, Biology, and English Literature. He has published over thirty technical papers related to Atmospheric Flight. His primary goal with the NASA Game Changing Program Office is to foster Entry, Descent, and Landing technology development that may eventually lead to a dramatic opening of spacecraft capabilities.

Michelle Munk is a Technology Project Manager at NASA-Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA. She has worked at NASA for over 20 years, in the areas of interplanetary trajectory design, EDL simulation, aerocapture, and most recently, EDL instrumentation (specifically the MSL Entry, Descent and Landing Instrumentation, or MEDLI). Michelle has been involved with the IPPW IOC and other committees for several years, and hosted IPPW-8 in 2010.

Dr. Anita Sengupta is a Project Manager in the Astronomy and Physics Directorate. She has been developing entry and propulsion systems for Mars, Venus, and deep space missions for the past decade at JPL. Currently she is the Project Manager for the Cold Atom Laboratory Mission, a multi-user ultra-cold quantum gas facility to be delivered to the International Space Station in 2016. She received her PhD and MS in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Southern California, where she is teaches undergraduate Spacecraft Design in the Astronautics and Space technology Department. She received her BS in Aerospace Engineering from Boston University.

Al Witkowski currently holds the position of Director of Engineering Operations at Zodiac Parachute & Protection America - Pioneer Aerospace Corporation in South Windsor, CT. He has been fortunate to be one of the persons responsible for every NASA Planetary Probe Aerodynamic Decelerator System for the last 25 years. This includes every Mars Lander, starting with Mars Pathfinder through the most recent Mars Science Laboratory, as well as the Stardust and Genesis sample return probes

Mark Adler
Michael Amato
Tibor Balint
Michael Bicay
Jens Biele
Bobby Braun
Neil Cheatwoodi
Ed Chester
Ioana Cozmuta
Al C Witkowski
Carlos Duartei
Karl Edquist
Jim Garvin
Kristin Gates-Medlock
Ali Guelhan
Scott Hubbard
Anthony Leavitt
Jean-Pierre Lebreton
Andres Martinezt
Doug McCuistion
Jean Muylaert
Periklis Papadopoulos
Cheryl Reed
Kim R Reh
Steve Ruffin
Stephen Sandford
Chuck Smith
Frank Sohl
Christine E Szalait
Stephan Ulamec
Ethiraj Venkatapathy
Michael Wright

Local Organizing Committee (LOC)

Name
Bio
Periklis Papadopoulos
Chair

Ravi works for the educational not-for-profit, Takshashila University (www.taksha.org), that manages the Journal of Small Satellite (www.jossonline.com). Through Taksha, he pursues his interests in re-education, STEM outreach, and technologies nexus with education. Takshashila will be supporting the International Journal for Planetary Probe (www.ijopp.com), as part of it's meetings and publications division. Taksha is very supportive of undergraduate and graduate research, and Taksha promotes their research by encouraging them to publish in community-driven, peer-reviewed journals (www.jossonline.com and www.ijopp.com).

Mr. Djordjevic is currently a full time Adjunct Faculty in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Santa Clara University in Santa Clara, California. Between 1983 and 2012 he was with Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, most recently as a Manager of the Aerodynamics, Fluid Mechanics and Performance group in the Engineering Department. His prior assignments include a Manager of the Design Guidance group, and a Space Technology Project Engineer on the NASA Space Station program, responsible for all thermal, structural, mass properties and chemical contamination design analyses under the Lockheed Martin contract. He was a Mission Operations lead engineer during the launch and deployment of two communication satellites under contract to the U.S. Air Force in the 1990s. He was a member of the management team overseeing the merger of Lockheed and Martin Marietta Corporations’ spacecraft lines of business during the mid-1990s. In the late 1990s and early 2000s, Mr. Djordjevich helped develop a comprehensive set of engineering processes covering all aspects of the space business at Lockheed Martin.

Prior to joining Lockheed Martin, Mr. Djordjevic was a Senior Engineer in the Advanced Systems Group in the Rockwell International’s Rocketdyne Division in Canoga Park, CA. In addition, at Aerojet Liquid Rocket Company in Sacramento, CA, he worked on the re-design of Space Shuttle’s Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) engines.

Mr. Djordjevic has been an Adjunct Faculty in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at San Jose State University since 1998, and Associate Faculty in Engineering at West Valley College in Saratoga, CA, since 1991.

Mr. Djordjevich graduated from UCLA School of Engineering and Applied Sciences with a BS (1976) and MS (1978) in Engineering.

Astronomer Dr. Peter Jenniskens is a Research Scientist with the SETI Institute and NASA Ames Research Center, author of the book Meteor Showers and their Parent Comets, a comprehensive overview of the field of meteor astronomy, published by Cambridge University Press. He was the Principal Investigator of NASA's 2006 Stardust Sample Return Capsule Entry Observing Campaign and the 2010 Hayabusa Reentry Observing Campaign, airborne missions that monitored the entry of planetary probes as system field tests of their thermal protection systems and to study artificial meteors.

Simon Kanis

Haris is a Computer Engineer and amateur astronomer, he is also ippw10 site administrator . Currently he is working on the lambdasat cube satellite, he is responsible for the software defined radios and ground station communications.


Program Organizing Committee (POC)

Name
Bio

Dr. Anita Sengupta is a Project Manager in the Astronomy and Physics Directorate. She has been developing entry and propulsion systems for Mars, Venus, and deep space missions for the past decade at JPL. Currently she is the Project Manager for the Cold Atom Laboratory Mission, a multi-user ultra-cold quantum gas facility to be delivered to the International Space Station in 2016. She received her PhD and MS in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Southern California, where she is teaches undergraduate Spacecraft Design in the Astronautics and Space technology Department. She received her BS in Aerospace Engineering from Boston University.

Chair

Dr. David H. Atkinson, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Idaho and the Associate Director of the Idaho NASA Space Grant and Idaho NASA EPSCoR (Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research) programs, has been a Principle or Co-Investigator on more than twenty NASA proposals, both research and educational. He was a Co-Investigator on the NASA/ESA (European Space Agency) Cassini/Huygens Doppler Wind Experiment that successfully measured the winds in the atmosphere of Titan (the largest moon of Saturn) in 2006, and was the Chair of the European Space Agency Huygens Probe Descent Trajectory Working Group. As the Lead of the Galileo Doppler Wind Experiment, Dr. Atkinson performed the first measurements of the very deep atmospheric winds on Jupiter in 1995.

Dr. Atkinson has undergraduate degrees from Whitman College (Astronomy/Physics) in 1977 and from Washington State University (Electrical Engineering) in 1980, a Master's degree in Applied Physics from Stanford University in 1981, and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Washington State University in 1989. From 1981 through 1986 Dr. Atkinson worked as a Systems Engineer at NASA Ames Research Center on the Galileo mission to Jupiter and the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF).

Dr. Atkinson is one of the co-founders of the International Planetary Probe Workshops along with Dr. Jean-Pierre Lebreton from ESA.

Jean-Marc Bouilly graduated from Ecole Centrale Paris in 1984. After joining EADS Astrium (Aerospatiale at that time) in 1985, he has been in charge of TPS development for military applications, and then for the Atmospheric Reentry Demonstrator ARD and Huygens. Later, he managed the Thermal and Thermomechanical Engineering section for 11 years. Since 2008, he has served as the Deputy Head of EADS Astrium’s Reentry Systems and Technologies Department and was appointed as an expert in thermal analysis and TPS. He is supporting advanced projects and preliminary projects phases for atmospheric entry vehicles (AeroFast, Rastas Spear, ARV, ExoMars, Radflight, Marco Polo, MSRO, EVE…) and is leading Astrium’s R&T activities on Reentry Technologies.

Athena Coustenis is Director of Research with the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) of France, working at Paris Observatory in Meudon. Her specialty is Planetology and Space Techniques. Her research is devoted to the investigation of planetary atmospheres and surfaces, with emphasis on icy moons like Titan and Enceladus, Saturn’s satellites, and Jupiter’s Ganymede and Europa, objects with high astrobiological potential. She also works on the characterisation of exoplanetary atmospheres.

She is Co-Investigator of three of the instruments (CIRS, HASI, DISR) aboard the Cassini/Huygens mission. In 2007 and 2008 she was the Lead European Scientist of the Titan/Saturn System Mission (TSSM) studied jointly by ESA and NASA. Since 2009, she was involved, as European Science co-Lead, in the JUICE mission to study Ganymede and the Jupiter’s system, currently planned for launch by ESA in 2022.

Her expertise in space missions has allowed her to Chair and to contribute in several advisory groups within ESA and NASA. She is currently President of the EGU Planetary Sciences Division and President of the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences, as well as Secretary of the Executive committee of the Division for Planetary Sciences.

Jody Davis is an Aerospace Engineer at NASA LaRC. She earned a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and M.S. in Aerospace Engineering from University of Virginia. She specializes in entry, descent and landing flight dynamics and trajectory simulation. Jody has worked missions such as Mars Phoenix and Mars Science Laboratory and is currently the LaRC flight dynamics technical lead for the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator flight test project. She is the co-convener for the Mars Science Laboratory EDL session.

PI of AMELIA: EDL science experiment of the ESA ExoMars project.

She has been deputy PI for the HASI instrument on the ESA Huygens probe of the NASA/ASI/ESA Cassini mission; Co-proposer /CoI of several in situ instruments (e.g. for Mars NetLander, ExoMars PASTEUR, Titan and Venus). She has been acting as Project Scientist of the NetLander project within the French Mars Sample Return programme at CNES (2000-2002).She has been studying planetary atmospheres and Martian dust devils by means of in situ measurements.

Dr.-Ing. Ali Gülhan is the Head of the Supersonic and Hypersonic Technology Department of the Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology of the German Aerospace Center (DLR in Cologne. He is currently manager of the DLR research projects IMENS (Integrarted Multidisciplinary Design of Spacecraft Hot Structures) in the frame of German national Space programme ASTRA (2000 - 2003) und subsequent projects IMENS+ (2003-2007) and IMENS-3C (2008-2011). He is also a Lecturer at the RWTH Aachen University with more than 80 journal and conference papers. He is the co-convener for the Cross Cutting Technologies for planetary entry session.

Rodrigo Haya is Aeronautical Engineer for the Polytechnics University of Madrid (UPM) and pilot. He is the head of the Atmospheric Flight Division in the Aerospace Engineering Business Unit of DEIMOS Space. Mr. Haya is responsible of the atmospheric Flight activities, covering Flight Mechanics, Mission analysis and Guidance, mostly related to planetary entry. He has more than 16 years experience in the aerospace sector, including work as Flight Test engineer for fighters and transport aircraft. He has been involved is most of atmospheric entry activities in ESA since 2003, covering covering robotic and manned missions, operational and experimental vehicles, ground and airborne launch, launchers and re-entry vehicles, Earth and exploration, institutional and commercial ventures. He has been involved in IPPW since 2007 (IPPW-5), being session chairman in IPPW-7, PoC EU chair in IPPW-8 and session convener in IPPW-10.

Ozgur Karatekin started his career at von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics (VKI) on aero-thermodynamics and dynamic stability of planetary entry probes. He is currently working at Royal Observatory of Belgium as Senior Research Scientist on present and future planetary missions.

Ralph Lorenz worked as an engineer for the European Space Agency on the design of the Huygens probe to Titan, and as a planetary scientist at the University of Arizona, and since 2006, at the JHU Applied Physics Lab. His activities have centered on Titan, Cassini-Huygens and future missions there, but his interests include Mars, dust devils, sand dunes, planetary climate and landscape, and aerospace systems. He is author or co-author of several books including 'Lifting Titan's Veil','Spinning Flight', and 'Space Systems Failures' as well as over 200 publications in refereed and popular journals. He is the co-convener for the Titan and Venus session.

Leila V. Lorenzoni received her Doctor Degree in Robotic Engineering with honours from University of Rome. She entered the Martian world by supporting ASI in the development of SHARAD. She then joined JPL where she gained significant experience on Mars probes as a flight system engineer for MRO and as an EDL system engineer for MSL. She is currently working at ESTEC as the EDL engineer for ExoMars. She is a member of the POC.

David Mimoun is an Associate Professor at Institut Superieur de l'Aeronautique et de l'Espace, for the SUPAERO Engineering Degree.

He was the LOC chair for IPPW9. He is currently SEIS instrument project scientist for the InSight mission.

Marc Murbach is a researcher at the NASA Ames Research Center. His interests have included novel re-entry probe concepts, small Mars mission concepts, instruments/nano-satellite development, as well as flight testing methodologies. With his team, he originated concepts such as a linear aerobrake, SCRAMP (Slotted Compression RAMP), the Exo-Brake de-orbit system, and TDRV (Tube Deployed Re-entry Vehicle). Application studies have included Mars Surface NanoSat mission (‘Atromos)’, a precision exobiology mission aimed at mid-latitude Martian aqueous zones (‘Aeolus’). In testing methodology, he has worked with high altitude balloon test beds, a sub-orbital test series (SOAREX – Sub-Orbital Aerodynamic Re-entry EXperiments), and most recently leading a team from NASA and the San Jose State University (SJSU) to successfully jettison the first U.S. nano-sat from the International Space Station (TechEdSAT). He is an adjunct professor (propulsion) at San Jose State University – and attended Harvey Mudd College, SJSU, Stanford, and the International Space University. As an avid mountaineer, he also co-led a successful NASA exo-biology field mission to the 6000m Licancabur volcanic lake in Bolivia (Murbach is on the far right; SOAREX-7 mission).

Michelle Munk is a Technology Project Manager at NASA-Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA. She has worked at NASA for over 20 years, in the areas of interplanetary trajectory design, EDL simulation, aerocapture, and most recently, EDL instrumentation (specifically the MSL Entry, Descent and Landing Instrumentation, or MEDLI). Michelle has been involved with the IPPW IOC and other committees for several years, and hosted IPPW-8 in 2010.

Dr. Kamal Oudrhiri is a senior member in the Radio Science Systems Group at NASAs Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Over the last decade, Oudrhiri led multi-disciplinary teams through the design, implementation and delivery of flight hardware to the radio science community. He has also served in key roles on multiple NASA missions: The Mars Exploration Rovers (MER), the International Cassini mission to Saturn, the GRAIL lunar mission and The Mars Science Laboratory. He is the co-convener for the Cross Cutting Technologies for planetary entry session.

Marie-Claire Perkinson currently leads the Exploration Group in the Future Programmes department of Astrium, which is responsible for carrying out Phase 0/A studies for future Planetary Exploration Missions. Over the last 13 years she has worked on a variety of mission programmes including fundamental physics, astrophysics, solar terrestrial physics and planetary science (orbital and landing elements). The main focus of her work has been in management of international multidisciplinary teams and mission and system engineering. She is the co-convener for the Airless Bodies session

Dr. Dinesh Prabhu is a Senior Staff Scientist with ERC, Inc., an onsite contractor at NASA Ames Research Center. He received his B.Tech. in Aeronautical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology at Madras, India, and his Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering from the Iowa State University at Ames, Iowa. His interests are in modeling and simulation of high-temperature hypersonic flow fields (for ground testing and flight), and in aerothermodynamic design of atmospheric entry vehicles and ground tests. He is the co-convener for the Cross Cutting Technologies for planetary entry session.

Al Witkowski currently holds the position of Director of Engineering Operations at Zodiac Parachute & Protection America - Pioneer Aerospace Corporation in South Windsor, CT. He has been fortunate to be one of the persons responsible for every NASA Planetary Probe Aerodynamic Decelerator System for the last 25 years. This includes every Mars Lander, starting with Mars Pathfinder through the most recent Mars Science Laboratory, as well as the Stardust and Genesis sample return probes

Andy Cheng
Ed Chester
Karl Edquist
Kelly Geelen
Rob Grover
Denis Lebleu
Isil Sakraker
Matt Sorgenfrei
Tom Spilker
Christine Szalai

Student Organizing Committee (SOC)

Name
Bio
STEPHEN RUFFIN
US Chair
JEAN-PIERRE LEBRETON
Co-Chair

Dr. David H. Atkinson, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Idaho and the Associate Director of the Idaho NASA Space Grant and Idaho NASA EPSCoR (Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research) programs, has been a Principle or Co-Investigator on more than twenty NASA proposals, both research and educational. He was a Co-Investigator on the NASA/ESA (European Space Agency) Cassini/Huygens Doppler Wind Experiment that successfully measured the winds in the atmosphere of Titan (the largest moon of Saturn) in 2006, and was the Chair of the European Space Agency Huygens Probe Descent Trajectory Working Group. As the Lead of the Galileo Doppler Wind Experiment, Dr. Atkinson performed the first measurements of the very deep atmospheric winds on Jupiter in 1995.

Dr. Atkinson has undergraduate degrees from Whitman College (Astronomy/Physics) in 1977 and from Washington State University (Electrical Engineering) in 1980, a Master's degree in Applied Physics from Stanford University in 1981, and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Washington State University in 1989. From 1981 through 1986 Dr. Atkinson worked as a Systems Engineer at NASA Ames Research Center on the Galileo mission to Jupiter and the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF).

Dr. Atkinson is one of the co-founders of the International Planetary Probe Workshops along with Dr. Jean-Pierre Lebreton from ESA.

David Mimoun is an Associate Professor at Institut Superieur de l'Aeronautique et de l'Espace, for the SUPAERO Engineering Degree.

He was the LOC chair for IPPW9. He is currently SEIS instrument project scientist for the InSight mission.

Ravi Deepak
Ricardo Diaz-Silva
Ali Guarneros Luna
Greg Swanson
Blanca Rebollar Trejo

Al Seiff Organizing Committee (ASOC)

Name
Bio
MICHAEL WRIGHT
Chair

Dr. David H. Atkinson, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Idaho and the Associate Director of the Idaho NASA Space Grant and Idaho NASA EPSCoR (Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research) programs, has been a Principle or Co-Investigator on more than twenty NASA proposals, both research and educational. He was a Co-Investigator on the NASA/ESA (European Space Agency) Cassini/Huygens Doppler Wind Experiment that successfully measured the winds in the atmosphere of Titan (the largest moon of Saturn) in 2006, and was the Chair of the European Space Agency Huygens Probe Descent Trajectory Working Group. As the Lead of the Galileo Doppler Wind Experiment, Dr. Atkinson performed the first measurements of the very deep atmospheric winds on Jupiter in 1995.

Dr. Atkinson has undergraduate degrees from Whitman College (Astronomy/Physics) in 1977 and from Washington State University (Electrical Engineering) in 1980, a Master's degree in Applied Physics from Stanford University in 1981, and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Washington State University in 1989. From 1981 through 1986 Dr. Atkinson worked as a Systems Engineer at NASA Ames Research Center on the Galileo mission to Jupiter and the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF).

Dr. Atkinson is one of the co-founders of the International Planetary Probe Workshops along with Dr. Jean-Pierre Lebreton from ESA.

Co-Chair

Athena Coustenis is Director of Research with the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) of France, working at Paris Observatory in Meudon. Her specialty is Planetology and Space Techniques. Her research is devoted to the investigation of planetary atmospheres and surfaces, with emphasis on icy moons like Titan and Enceladus, Saturn’s satellites, and Jupiter’s Ganymede and Europa, objects with high astrobiological potential. She also works on the characterisation of exoplanetary atmospheres.

She is Co-Investigator of three of the instruments (CIRS, HASI, DISR) aboard the Cassini/Huygens mission. In 2007 and 2008 she was the Lead European Scientist of the Titan/Saturn System Mission (TSSM) studied jointly by ESA and NASA. Since 2009, she was involved, as European Science co-Lead, in the JUICE mission to study Ganymede and the Jupiter’s system, currently planned for launch by ESA in 2022.

Her expertise in space missions has allowed her to Chair and to contribute in several advisory groups within ESA and NASA. She is currently President of the EGU Planetary Sciences Division and President of the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences, as well as Secretary of the Executive committee of the Division for Planetary Sciences.

Tibor Balint
Andrew Ball
Bobby Braun
Jean-Pierre Leberton
Ethiraj Venkatapathy